East End Eco-Ventures

Join us to explore the east end of Long Island through nature-based outdoor adventures and educational activities.

The chicken or the egg

baby-chick

What came first? The chicken or the egg? I’m not sure either… but meet the ladies! Day-old chicks arrived via USPS in May –  a small, peeping box of pure adorable-ness.

brooder-1It seemed as though you could see their growth daily. Plenty of fresh greens and veggies to supplement their diet, along with garlic and apple cider vinegar in their water weekly to boost their immune systems. I avoid vaccinations and medicated feeds.chick-forageAs soon as we had some warm days, the chicks were out foraging for the day.chick-lovin

A feathered friend.

final-coop

Finally, their house was completed and the chicks were soon to begin their new life at the farm.

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Moving day was a nice way to get to know the surprise rooster a little better.
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The move was a fun group effort.  
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I savored every moment.

happy-home

Fresh pasture – this couldn’t be a happier flock.
hawk-protection-net

Fishing net provided a initial attempt at protection from hawks.

dust-bath

Caught in the act – dust bath. to-the-farm

Their forage area consists of diversity of vegetation: from open grassy areas to edges transitioning to dense shrub layers which provide some shade and protection from hawks.  fence-line-grass

Rotating their forage area allows them fresh forage. Here, you can see the contrast in vegetation cover where the fence line was set up.

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Chicken’s-eye view. 
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Visitor’s-eye view.

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And finally: eggs!

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